Cedar Summer: late summer silhouette & whimsy

by Anita Lubesh

waxwing

I was inspired yet again by the fabulous, sock monkey.

for the Waxwing,
summer withers
sending the bare bones
of blooms to exit; their shift over

high up on defoliated twigs,
these sturdy spires become crows nests –
for one last look at sparse reminders
and stark remainders

and perched reverently
with subdued crest, rakish black mask
and brilliant-red wax
droplets fallen on tail feathers –
splashes of hot springs
long before flames burned out,
they are temporary beacons
for the Indian summer
as birds gradually disappear
like iron filings
falling from silky paper

soon they will fly south
for winter before shivers ruffle
silver grey feathers, autumnal
splendour from its box of tricks
is spilt and trickery dazzles us
with cooler combinations
of life clothed in warmer
costume

like petrified stone,
stygian contours champion the night sky;
dulled for now, but grey streaks charm
expectations sat on the horizon

where silhouettes shudder,
and disrupted delineation means time for bugs
as they share the yawning night
with grey squirrels
tiptoeing on slender spindles
so as not to disturb me

they are companion to my thoughts
silent and reflective – undisturbed
morsels like tiny trails of sunflower seeds;
spent tears,
trophies of summer,
wishes that traced the blue,
blue sky,

the grey squirrel is a small
reminder hoarding the remainders
of sunflowers and their holiday romances
with summer’s bronzed face
when they meekly
brushed the air with smiling optimism

held spellbound, a perfect mime, until
summer comes again and the birds return.

 

14 Comments to “Cedar Summer: late summer silhouette & whimsy”

  1. trophies of summer, indeed – wonderful

  2. Truly a fantastic poetic portrait. Well captured and emotionally expressed. 😉

  3. Antia, a lovely poem about the summer.

    You forgot the tags in your excitement 🙂

  4. A wonderful August poem glimpsing what lies ahead, confident that what has been will be again . . . Love it!

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